Seagate 1 TB Hard Disk: The Best Budget Storage Device for You

Seagate 1 TB Hard Disk: The Best Budget Storage Device for You

If you are looking for additional storage for your windows laptop/PC which offers fast read speed, without burning a hole in your pocket, then you can consider Seagate Expansion 1TB hard drive. The device can be very helpful if you need to save games on an external portable hard drive.

Seagate 1 TB Hard Disk

What is a Hard Disk?

In simple terms, It is an extra storage system. It also comes with a connection for power, and many come with jumper settings, which allow the motherboard to recognize that a new hard disk drive has been installed.

 Inside all hard drives, there are small round disks called platters, which are coated with a special coating that allows the hard drive to store data magnetically.

So much of our everyday lives are centered around the computer. We use computers to store our photos and videos, to get work done, and to communicate with our friends via the internet. None of that would be possible without the hard drive.

Seagate 1 TB Hard Disk

The hard drive is the component that stores all the data on your computer, from files to software. It’s the central storage bank for our digital lives.

Unfortunately, hard drives don’t have an unlimited amount of space. While 500GB storage is more than enough for most users, you might run out of free space if you have lots of large files like movies, PC games, and editing files.

Thankfully, you can always use an external hard drive to store your computer data and this is where the Seagate 1TB External Hard Drive

Seagate 1 TB Hard Disk Capacity & Performance

If you are searching for Seagate Expansion reviews to know about the storing capacity of the external hard drive, your search ends here.

Seagate Expansion 1TB portable external hard drive can store up to 1,000 hours of digital video or up to 250 DVD movies of 2 hours duration each.

Seagate 1 TB Hard Disk

When it comes to storing images and music files, the drive offers space for up to 320,000 images or 16660 hours of music.

The main drawback of this hard drive is that it doesn’t offer backup software. So it is advisable not to store sensitive data in this external drive. You can still use 3rd party backup software.

When it comes to speed, you can get around 120Mbps speed for both writing and reading respectively.

As discussed earlier, the Seagate expansion hard drive is compatible with USB 2.0 as well but the data transfer rate will be quite low.

Seagate 1 TB Hard Disk Design and Features

Seagate is definitely focusing on design with this model. The company has gone for a credit-card shape, though despite claims that this device can be slipped into a wallet, it’s much too thick for that.

In fact, this drive is almost exactly the same size as the very popular Samsung SSD T5, though very different in design.

There’s a distinctive textured fabric panel on the top, and a cloth tab with the Seagate logo on one side.

Seagate 1 TB Hard Disk

The 1TB version of this SSD is available only in white and black, but if you choose the 500GB version, there are special editions with blue, green, red, or grey camouflage prints.

Additional artist editions for both capacities are shown on Seagate’s US website though these don’t appear to be available here, and there’s the possibility of more designs coming out in the future.

For a device that’s positioned as modern and fashionable, we’re quite surprised to see an old Micro-USB 3.0 port on the back, like most external hard drives still use.

This isn’t as convenient as a USB Type-C Port, which we’d expect on an SSD. Seagate also doesn’t include a Type-C cable or adapter, so those with sleek Type-C-only laptops will need to buy an adapter of their own.

Seagate 1 TB Hard Disk Specifications and Performance

What matters most for an SSD is speed, and the Seagate One Touch SSD is rated for data transfers of up to 400MBps, which refers to sequential speeds.

The company has not published any further details about the drive’s performance. The warranty period is three years.

Our 1TB unit was formatted using the ExFAT file system with 931.51GB of usable space. You’ll need to reformat or partition it if you intend to use Time Machine for backups on a Mac.

We would have liked hardware or software encryption, but that isn’t a native feature.

We ran our tests using our standard test bench, built out of an AMD Ryzen 7 2700X CPU, a Gigabyte Aorus X470 Gaming 7 Wifi motherboard, 2x8GB of G.skill DDR4 RAM, a 1TB Samsung SSD 860 Evo boot drive, a Sapphire Nitro+ Radeon RX 590 graphics card, and a Corsair RM650 power supply.

Seagate 1 TB Hard Disk Simple Design

The Seagate Expansion portable 1TB external hard drive only measures 4.8 inches by 3.2 inches by 0.6 inches. This makes the external hard drive very easy to carry about you.

 It is tiny enough to fit in a lady’s purse or a man’s trouser or jacket pocket. It is also robust and will easily survive most small falls and bumps which means, your data will remain safe.

Hard Drive Speed

Inside the Seagate Expansion 1TB hard drive is an energy efficient device that spins at a slow 5,400 rotations per minute, and not the usual 7,200rpm found on most hard drives.

The slower spin speed does not translate into the slower performance but instead means lower power consumption without loss of some performance. The Seagate Expansion1TB Hard Drive comes in a carton and includes a twelve-inch long 3.0 Micro USB cable.

There is no instruction leaflet. This is all that is required to get you up and running the moment you open the box.

Just like all other portable drives, the Seagate Expansion is bus-powered, needing only one cable for data and power. The moment you connect, you should see the extra drive appear on your computer. Then it is a simple matter of dragging and dropping files into the new external drive folder.

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Formatting Your Hard Disk

When you open the box you’ll find your Seagate expansion Hard Drive is factory formatted to the NTFS file system so it works right away with any Windows computer including the new Windows 10 operating system.

If you have a Mac computer, you can easily reformat it to HFS+ in just a few seconds. Generally speaking, this type of external hard drive is much cheaper means of storage than a Mac dedicated hard drive.

It is even possible to use the hard drive in a mixed Windows and Mac environment; you can do this by reformatting using the exFAT file system.

PROS OF SEAGATE EXPANSION 1TB

  • The portable hard drive is quite easy to set up.
  • No need for additional software to install on the computer.
  • Windows automatically recognizes the drive.
  • Backward compatible with USB 2.0.
  • Light and compact.
  • Plug and play.
  • Decent read/write speed.

CONS OF SEAGATE EXPANSION 1TB

  • The drive doesn’t come with backup software.
  • So if the drive fails or there is data corruption by any means
  • Short Warranty.

Once I back up my data, do I need to restore it to access it or can I access the files directly on my Seagate Seven drive?

The Seagate Dashboard does not use a proprietary format to back up your data; you are not required to use the Dashboard to access your backed-up data. You can browse your backed-up data by accessing your Seagate Seven drive in Windows Explorer.

Frequently Asked Question

These frequently asked questions about hard drives should help broaden your knowledge of your computer and the hard drive that makes all the magic happen.

If I switch from continuous backup to a scheduled backup, will my backup data still be available…and vice versa?

Yes, the change in the frequency does not affect the file structure.

Does the Dashboard back up open files, whether continuous or scheduled?

Yes, the Dashboard attempts to back up files that are open for continuous and scheduled backup plans.

How can I diagnose problems with my hard drive?

A great place to start with hard drive diagnostics is right at the manufacturer’s website. All major brand drives will have utilities for their drives, such as Maxtor’s Maxblast or Western Digital’s Data Lifeguard. Or Check out the Acronis Hard Drive Monitor–it’s free.

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